Articles

Dogs

  • Osteoarthritis is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. Although dramatically under-recognized, OA is actually one of the most common chronic diseases of dogs. In addition to diet modifications, exercise, weight loss, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, management strategies for OA may include a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug such as PSGAG. PSGAG is a disease modifying agent that slows cartilage destruction, promotes cartilage healing, and helps lubricate the joints. It is given as a series of injections that can be given by an owner at home. A positive response is expected at the end of the first course of treatment. Injections are typically used long-term as PSGAG is well-tolerated by most dogs.

  • Since we want the best for our pets, we should include them in the go green movement. Here are a few ways you can create a cleaner, greener home for you and your pet.

  • The simple description of an abscess is a pocket of pus located somewhere in the body.

  • Acepromazine is used as a sedative and a pre-anesthetic agent. It also possesses the following properties: prevents vomiting, prevents muscle spasms, alleviates itching as a result of skin irritation and decreases temperature.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain.

  • Acetaminophen is a medication that is used to treat fever and/or pain in humans. Acetaminophen is toxic for dogs, and unfortunately, acetaminophen toxicity in dogs is somewhat common as dog owners attempt to treat their dogs for pain without first consulting with a veterinarian.

  • This medicine may be prescribed to treat glaucoma – a disease of the eye that increases intraocular pressure and produces defects in the field of vision. Acetazolamide will reduce the amount of pressure in the eye.

  • Canine acne is an inflammatory disorder of the lips and the skin of the muzzle. Dogs with mild cases of acne often have red bumps or pustules (pimples) on their skin. In some cases, acne may be associated with underlying skin conditions. There are a variety of treatments that may be used for the treatment of canine acne.

  • New medical advancements are extraordinary, yet many veterinarians are turning to a form of ancient medicine to help their patients. Utilizing centuries-old techniques of acupuncture and acupressure may enhance traditional veterinary medicine and further benefit the canine community.

  • The term limber tail is one of several slang terms that apply to a condition that is technically called acute caudal myopathy.

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